Ingrid S. Greene
Communications Professional for the Wellness Industry

Ingrid@yogatohavefun.com

travel

Food In The Car

Often, my husband and I will eat meals in the car.  We live in LA so perhaps this is par for the course.  We spend a good amount of time in the car.

This week, I received some reusable pouches for smoothies and I’m excited to use them (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00QRGZQWI).  Eating these smoothies in these pouches will be much easier than putting the smoothie in a to-go bottle.  My husband is also often skeptical to eat vegetables so I’m hoping to sneak a few in without him noticing as well.

Here’s a recipe that I am looking forward to using from www.littlegreenpouch.com:

Ingredients:
2 cups fresh spinach
2 cups milk
2 cups red grapes
2 bananas
4 tablespoons almond butter
Directions:

Blend spinach and almond milk until smooth. Next add the remaining fruits and blend again.

*Freeze your grapes overnight to chill this green smoothie.

Fills 6-8 Pouches

Do you use pouches for yourselves or your kids? Let me know if you like them!

Getting Away for 48 Hours

Last weekend, my husband and I went camping for two nights in the Los Padres Mountains outside of Ojai, California. Some campsites get cell phone reception where we go, but this one didn’t.

At first, we were scrambling. Did we send out all the emails we needed to before we entered the site? What would we do if someone needed to get in touch with us during the time that we were there? Soon we entered into our camp routine, but honestly, I was often thinking about what messages I may be missing while we were away.

When we returned to civilizations on Sunday afternoon I had two realizations. First, there was nothing that I was missing while we were away. No important emails came in and the people who need me most on a daily basis were with me the whole time, my husband and my dog.

Second, the break from technology gave my husband and I a chance to speak about topics that probably would have never come up if we had had the distraction of everyday life. Not only were our minds relaxed and we could think more easily of creatives topics, but by needing to come up with more topics of conversation, we dug deeper into ones we had already had. We were also not distracted so a conversation had each of our full attentions.

I highly recommend getting out of town for two nights and letting the mind relax. It’s not easily to leave the world behind, but the world that you enter is well worth it.

A dog and her tent #ojaiunplugged #camping

A photo posted by Ingrid S. Greene (@ingridwellness) on


The Value of Reaching Out

Last night, I saw a guy on a bike in a busy intersection at night and he had a flashing light on both the front and the back of his bike. I thought of how useful this is. At first, I thought that the light didn’t need to flash, but as I thought about it more, I realized that it does. He is so vulnerable on a bike and just a steady light could be a street light, a car, or store sign. The flashing light brings our attention closer to him and helps protect his vulnerability.

Riding a bike brought me back to the days when I lived in a small town in Germany and used a bike as my primary mode of transportation. My bike was so basic and had no lights. Riding a bike was so fun. I would jump on it and scoot into town from my apartment to visit friends. When I would think about my journey, I knew that the bike would get me there so much faster than walking. With this knowledge, I was always much more energetic to make the three mile trek.

It’s been over fifteen years since I lived in Germany, but the friendships I made in that town still last today. I think about how the bike helped me to facilitate and then solidify relationships that I would have never made by sitting in my room alone.

Just last week, I was laughing on Skype with a friend who would meet me four to five nights a week when I arrived with my bike. He is a global leader in Google Analytics these days and who knew that he would go down this path when he would tutor me in German on those evenings.

It was also on those evenings that I talked to him about the U.S. and introduced volunteer programs to him in Boston where the following year he would go to work on his English. He certainly wouldn’t be a leader in an American technology if it wasn’t for that bike and our friendship.

I think of these times today when I sometimes find myself staying at home and not reaching out to friends or “getting on my bike”. So much of my life has come from relationships that I’ve built with people over a conversation. With these thoughts, I look forward to again meeting people in town and seeing what comes of it.